Good News from the Food Industry

grocerystoremomentoftruthA couple of years ago, I posted a video link to the ABC News documentary, How to Get Fat Without Really Trying.  In that video, the late Peter Jennings interviews the president of the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA).

His responses so blithely dismissed the needs of the consumer in favor of the needs of the GMA, which are increased sales without regard to food safety or the negative effects of marketing junk food to kids.

The GMA is one of the largest and most powerful lobbying groups that wields great influence on food policy in Washington, D. C.  Most often, not to the benefit of the consumer.

I was totally disgusted by the GMA president in the video. That documentary, along with a few others, was one of the biggest influences for me to quit eating popular brand-name processed food.

If you haven’t seen How to Get Fat… you can access it here.   It’s several years old but the message is timeless–especially in light of the news I read today.

My favorite food policy guru, Marion Nestle, via her blog, Food Politics, tells us that many national food manufactures are feeling the pinch of the public demand for better food. I say its about time.

They’re caught between the consumer and the GMA, which opposes anything that would make food safer and more nutritious. In their mind, that translates to “less profitable.”

Professor Nestle tells us that several national food manufacturers have now left the GMA over disagreements on many issues. Some of those companies’ products had been old favorites of mine that I gave up buying after watching the ABC documentary.

I’m happy to hear of their defection from the GMA but it remains to be seen if they change the nutritional profiles of their products.


Here’s Professor Nestle’s report:

I’ve written many times about the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), an organization so locked into the interests of its food-company donors that you can count on it to vehemently oppose every consumer-friendly measure that gets proposed. A couple of weeks ago, Politico’s Helena Bottemiller Evich and Catherine Boudreau wrote what they discovered about the unraveling […]

via Defections from the Grocery Manufacturers Association: Rats leaving a sinking ship? — Food Politics by Marion Nestle

Do You Suffer from Excessive Stuff Syndrome?

It is guesstimated that nearly 48.9% of the U. S. population suffers from this condition!

WHAT IS ESS?

Excessive Stuff Syndrome (ESS) is a debilitating syndrome that has been known to cause mild to severe anxiety, elevated stress levels, and a sense of overwhelm and despair.

WHO DOES IT AFFECT?

It is estimated that nearly 48.9 percent of the U. S. population suffers from ESS, more than half female aged 40 to 80+. Common contributing factors for developing this syndrome include:

  • Strong desire for creativity
  • Interest in arts, crafts, or special hobbies
  • A love of reading and learning new things
  • Special interest in collecting
  • Underdeveloped or non-existent storage and organization skills

HOW DOES ESS DEVELOP?

ESS often begins in childhood with the onset of SSS or Saving Special Stuff, typically in small-to-medium sized containers or special drawers.

Those afflicted by SSS experience strong tendencies to save things that interest them, based upon one or more of the contributing factors listed above:

  • Books about interests (common to all forms of SSS)
  • Post cards
  • Mail advertising packets
  • Postage stamps
  • Magazine photos
  • Badges and buttons
  • Magnetic cards to stick on fridge or file cabinet
  • Keychains from trade or home shows
  • Notebooks
  • Calendars
  • Any items containing attractive visual representations of the interest focus.

HOW DOES ESS MANIFEST?

As children grow, so too do their interests. Often, growth and expansion of the interest will lead to the next stage of development, SSNS or Saving of New Stuff. The further the syndrome develops, the more precise, sophisticated, and necessary the Required Stuff becomes.

The books become larger or more accumulated and here now may be subscriptions to magazines that must be saved. Posters and charts become valuable and cherished.

Friends and family members, often unknowingly, enable the development of SSNS through gifts of activity kits or implement sets. Once the activity is adopted, there follows a need for more supplies and implements.

Other Contributing Factors to ESS

SSNS can also develop from interests that necessitate the need for special clothing such as uniforms, costumes,  identity apparel (special clothing for meetings or events), footwear, head gear, and equipment. As the child grows, the need for larger spaces in which to store it all increases.

If the contributing factor of a love for reading and learning is involved, there may be the added tendency toward accumulation of:

  • More books
  • Magazine subscriptions (as noted above)
  • Mail-order kits and learning programs
  • Notebooks
  • Binders or scrapbooks for collecting loose pages, instruction booklets, and clippings from magazines and newspapers.

HOW SSS and SSNS DEVELOPS INTO ESS

The leading contributor to ESS is the attachment to keeping the things collected from the onset of SSS into adulthood.

A primary triggering factor of ESS begins to emerge in the teen years, from about ages 15 to 21. This is the time when teens begin to consider moving away from home to attend college, go to work, or explore their options. It is a time when one must consider what they will take with them and what can be parted with.

This is also the time when the patient becomes highly susceptible to the  triggering factor of ESS known as TIIS or This Is Important Stuff.

The main symptom of TIIS is an inability to discern the Truly Important from the Possibly Unimportant. The patient may begin to experience feelings of great attachment to the Special Stuff Saved from the blossoming of their special interests as a child.

That first activity kit project becomes symbolic of their life-long love of their interest of choice. The young adult feels a great need to keep this object either on display or in a place of safekeeping.

There may be collections of instructions and how-to clippings still to be tried out that cannot be parted with yet. There may still be activity kits not yet assembled. There are still things to be explored.

HOW ESS ESTABLISHES ITSELF

The TIIS factor plays a large part in the decision-making process that arises out of the SSS and SSNS phases. Each and every item, piece, part, document and scrap must be put through the TIIS test. Is This Important Stuff or Is It Not?

The more the interest has established itself in the young person’s mind, the more difficult it becomes to determine Important from Not Important Stuff. Typically, the patient undergoes such stress and sense of turmoil that a decision is made: This is ALL Important Stuff.

All the Important Stuff is then boxed up and moved to the new location, and often, to new subsequent locations.

It is at this point that a definite diagnoses of Excess Stuff Syndrome can be made.

HOW IS ESS TREATED?

There is no known cure for ESS. Treatment can include Resolve Development where the patient decides to close the eyes and toss things out, or seek the help of a trusted friend to support this treatment.

Another form of treatment is to develop the skill of Storage and Organization.  which can be both a solution and the trigger for a secondary from of ESS known as CSC, or the Collection of Storage Containers.

CSC can mask the manifestation of ESS by creating a false sense of control by appearing to have organized and controlled the spread of ESS by having a Place For Everything, and Everything In Its Place. This can lead to an aggravation of the original trigger of SSS (Saving Special Stuff), which in turn exacerbates CSC. This can develop into a self-perpetuating and chronic ESS condition.

Chronic ESS can be a very debilitating condition. It can develop into an actual behavioral health diagnosis of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder manifesting as a condition known as Hoarding.

This could ultimately require Professional Psychological Treatment if your ESS goes beyond this tongue-in-cheek article describing the condition in a  light-hearted manner. (See Disclaimer below).

OTHER SUGGESTED TREATMENTS

With that in mind, there are other milder treatments that really could be applied in less serious cases of ESS:

  • Scanning paper documents and photographing childhood projects and saving them to computer, discs, jump drives or cloud drives
  • Building and dedicating a small museum or section in your local public library or community center devoted to your interest for the education of friends, neighbors, and future generations
  • Donating your collection to a youth group or club
  • Cashing in on your stash by offering it for sale at an online sales website
  • Holding a special garage sale for others interested in your stuff

These treatments could trigger one beneficial side-effect. Seeing your Special Stuff going to people who will greatly appreciate it and give it a good home can bring about positive results, and possibly even cure your ESS.

PROFESSIONALLY-SUGGESTED TREATMENTS

There are also some mind and brain balancing techniques that can help:

  • Mindfulness Meditation
  • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), also called ‘Tapping’
  • Support Groups and Talk Therapy – explore your thoughts about your  stuff and its meaning with others who have ESS
  • Home Organization Coaching
  • Journal Writing Therapy – working out your thoughts about ‘stuff’

The last one has worked well for this article’s author. It was an ESS near-meltdown during a studio organization session that sparked the article. Writing it out led to the list of suggestions for help with this insidious syndrome, and possibilities for its treatment if not a permanent cure.

If you suffer from ESS or its trigger or secondary conditions of SSS, SSNS, TIIS, or CSC, try out some of the suggested treatments to see if they help.

DISCLAIMER:

This article is not intended to diagnose or suggest treatment for OCD or any other related disorders, nor is it intended to belittle or ridicule such disorders. The “conditions” described above are not real conditions but developed out of the author’s imagination.

This article is strictly intended as satire and actually pokes fun at the author herself. Suggested treatments are based upon the author’s research into mind-body healing techniques that can help to deal with the issues of Saving Special Stuff and Excessive Stuff Syndrome.

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2017 Fall Edition

gimage-fall-woods-walk-960_720

Wow–the first two weeks of September literally blew right by me!

For us living in the U. S., Labor Day Weekend signals the end of Summer, although the official end is the 22nd, and that’s the date I go by although Labor Day has its influences as well.

For me, Labor Day signifies the beginning of my Fall Quarter: September, October, November. Even as a child, my calendar ran a bit differently than the usual January to December. To me, a year always begins around the Fall Equinox because that’s when I was born.

Several years ago, I started making New Year resolutions on my birthday rather than on January 1. That way, I didn’t feel so bad about starting my “new year” work nine months late. But that’s not the real reason I changed the New Year cycle.

The real reason is that, over the years, I noticed that my energy level was so much more ‘up’ in the Fall than in the middle of Winter. I’m another year older, another year wiser (hopefully!).

But then–I also live in Northeastern Minnesota, about 90 miles south of the Canadian border. Here, Fall means digging in for the Winter and being prepared not to go out too much. To work, home from work. A few trips out for groceries and supplies.

So Fall is a time of wrapping up the Summertime lifestyles and preparing for the Winter ones. Our winters run about six months: October to March. We’re kind of like Scandinavia that way. That’s why so many of them settled in this area in the 1800’s–it reminded them of home.

Those are all reasons why I operate on a seasonal schedule rather than the typical yearly calendar of the Gregorians. It might also explain why I gravitated toward work in sales and marketing after community college. Retail runs on a seasonal year too.

The sad part about that is it means preparing for Fall halfway through Summer. In those days, we used top-most shelving (called a ‘riser’) to put up displays of large items like seasonal yard ornaments or home décor. The year I found myself draping a Halloween spider web on the back side of a Christmas tree was the year I started getting depressed about holidays. Well, not so much the holidays but by the seemingly rapid passing of time from one season to the next. If you work in retail or marketing, you know about this.

So here I had my nice Fall schedule all laid out and ready to plug in right after Labor Day and WTHeck, it’s already the end of the second week. Time flies when you’re not looking.

What about you? Does your New Year run from January to December or do you operate by seasons? If you’ve never thought about it, take some time to do that now. Try to notice the times of year that your energy peaks or falls off.

When you discover your peak season or months, that’s the time to start new behavior or lifestyle change programs–when you’re energy is higher and you feel more positive.  But if your season is Winter and that’s when you want to make changes, and you’re able to dodge all the goodies that come with Winter holidays–then please share how you do that in the Sharing Box below:

  1. S.– September is also Be Kind to Editors and Writers Month. Help me out by leaving a comment in the box on your thoughts on this article or to ask a question.
  2. P. S. — I’ve been working on ways to change sweet-baking recipes into healthier ones. I’ll be sharing those as I work on a new recipe book, The DIY Nutrition Kitchen.

If you have healthy Fall/Winter holiday meal and snack recipes to share, please email them rather than posting in the comments box to make it easier for us to collect and compile them.  

Send your recipes to editor@healthylifestylesmedia.com

NOTE: Your own original recipes are preferred, or your healthy changes to existing recipes. If you post a recipe from another site or blog, please be kind to the editor/writer of the site and credit them in your post.

Learn Something New This Week

VirginiaPublicLibrary

My own local public library

It’s Back to School time for the kids and the college students of whatever age.

In a way, I’m glad I finished my degree and don’t have to worry about getting ready for another quarter. In another way, I miss the new learning and the sparking of ideas from that learning that would excite me about whatever I was studying.

You don’t need to be in school or enrolled in any course to be a student of something you’re interested in. It doesn’t have to be academic–it can be a hobby or a fascination with something in particular, say gardening, woodworking, playing an instrument, or whatever absorbs your interest.

Studies have shown that curiosity and a desire to learn new things go a long way toward strengthening your memory and cognitive functions. It is said that people who read more, watch educational television or videos, or spend time on a hobby maintain higher brain function into their 80’s and 90’s.

(I do have references on this stuff, just not handy right now. I eventually hope to have them available in some form down the road.)

All you need for exercising your mind is a public library. Free media everywhere on anything you ever wanted to know about. Books, videos, recordings, newspapers, magazines plus digital formats of paper media.

It’s the best of both worlds: free information on nearly anything and everything, in paper and/or digital formats, for people with or without computers.

I’ve been a library bookworm since childhood. But, during my recent studies, I got used to getting books on Kindle, and using downloaded e-books instead of ordering $300 textbooks or $18.00 paperback novels (that’s ridiculous!). We could also download research material to print if we wanted to but I like saving the forests.

Because of that, I hadn’t been to my library in years. I do pick up a lot of books and videos from garage sales but that’s different: you’re not seeking out a specific topic, you’re picking up books that interest you that just happen to be there.

You walk into a library and pick a section related to your interest and BAM–suddenly you don’t know where to start. Me, I always go for the “beginners’ guide to…” or “an introduction to…” if I’m learning something new.

If it’s something I’ve been learning about and want to know more, I’ll look for “techniques in…” or “the (practioner’s) guide to…(interest)”. These would be like the ‘watercolor painter’s guide to flowers’ or ‘the gardener’s guide to organic vegetables’. You already know about gardening but now want to learn to do it organically.

My particular favorites for exploring either new or familiar topics  are the For Dummies and the Everything (Topic) series. There’s almost nothing that hasn’t been covered by someone in any line of work. Many of those authors are university professors or professionals in that area so you know you’re getting good, solid  information–for the most part.

I have read some that confused me because the author of a “‘beginner’s guide” assumed the reader already knew a lot about the topic. If they assume that then why are they writing a “beginner’s guide”? Something I’ve often wondered.

Many authors of these series update their work every year, especially if the subject is one that changes frequently, like the Internet, economics, or social media. Others are timeless, like arts n’ crafts instruction using techniques that haven’t changed for centuries such as fiber arts, preserving, or wood-working.

Your library’s how-to video section is a good place to go too. I find it easier to watch something done than to read how its done. Some of the For Dummies books are also on video, which is very helpful for visual instruction like fitness workouts, Yoga or using the Internet.

If you already do use the Internet regularly, you can find literally zillions of free how-to videos from YouTube, Pinterest, Facebook and other social media sites as well.

Libraries also make use of the Internet to assist people. They offer access to all sorts of online information databases, can help locate media and get it from other libraries, and provide you with your own library ‘home page’ where you can keep your lists of things to look for and manage your loans, returns, and holds.

Now–what’s really cool about libraries: if you don’t own a computer, you can get time at your public library, and if you need to, you can have someone walk you through learning how to find stuff.

No matter your age or learning style, there are many ways for you to learn about something you’ve been interested in–or something entirely new–for FREE at your nearest public library.

So, in honor of Back to School Week, get out there and learn something new.

 

 

 

 

Fall Fitness Challenge

gimage-fall-woods-walk-960_720Autumn leaves in NE Minnesota already. Almost had frost last week. Eeek!

The Fall Monsoons are gearing up now too. As I write, there’s some really high, tree-branch scattering winds blowing. I hope my garden pots don’t get tipped. Oh well–it’s time to start wrapping up the garden anyway.

As much as I love September, I hate to think it’s time to wrap up Summer. I usually have until my birthday to get in a little more Summer. (It’s the 26th, in case you were thinking of sending a card 😉 ) It’s a milestone birthday too so it’s a very good time to roll out a new fitness plan.

Or rather, get back to the online program I was using. I don’t usually use it during the Summer since I belong to a community fitness group in my hometown. We wrapped that up last week. This was our second year. The first year, we were solely a walking club and walked around the 2 small lakes and the large park in our town once a week all together.

This year we added a variety of fitness activities to try out like QiGong, kayaking, disc golf, Zumba, Yoga, and Strength-Training. We also tried out lawn games like croquet, badminton, and bocce ball. I remember as a kid, our parents would get together at the neighbor’s house to play volleyball. They also belonged to bowling leagues. People just don’t do stuff like that anymore, and it’s too bad. It’s a fun way to keep fit and socialize at the same time. I think there should be Lawn Game Clubs too.

Anyway–back to that online fitness program. About five years ago, I discovered this really cool wellness site, The Daily Challenge. If you’re not familiar with this, it’s a ‘package’ of different programs, or tracks, as they call them.

It’s free to join, which fits nicely into the frugal philosophy of DIY Healthy Lifestyles. You choose a track from a wide assortment of fitness and wellness programs and click ‘join’. Then you receive a daily notification by email, IM, or SMS (message to phone or device) that gives you a simple 5- to 10-minute activities to do related to the track you are in. You can choose to join more than one track if you’d like a variety of things to do during the day.

There is a new one that’s been added since I was last there. It’s called Better Weight but it goes beyond the typical diet and exercise programs. This one includes behavior change prompts for finding support, managing stress, and staying motivated. It’s that last one that caught my attention.

Seems like every Fall, I feel so good about the weight and BMI I’ve dropped and I vow to maintain it. But then there’s birthday cake and pizza, then Halloween, then Thanksgiving, then Christmas… I know that’s an excuse but you have to admit it’s not a bad one. I’ve been working on ways to make the holidays less fattening and healthier.

But, staying motivated is a challenge. So that’s why I chose to sign up for The Daily Challenge’s Better Weight Track. I’m inviting my friends and followers to join me in this program. Let’s start our own wellness group here to get and stay motivated!

Here’s where we’ll meet. If you’re not already a Daily Challenge member, it’s free to join so just sign up if you’re interested in getting together.

Hope to hear from you soon–
Kat

Don’t Believe Everything You Read

study-reportsMy favorite nutrition guru, Marion Nestle, has again posted about something  that has always irked me: studies that tell you that a certain food is good/bad for you. The bottom line is that it all depends upon who is funding the study and where their interests lie.

In this article Professor Nestle (who, btw, is not related to the chocolate company), is interviewed by a reporter looking into a study on chocolate. Professor Nestle provides some excellent insight into food studies as a whole, and educates us about why we shouldn’t always buy into the headlines like “study shows this or that food is good/bad for us”.

There is more to know about the behind-the-scenes motives in the publication of nutrition studies.

What is revealed here can be applied to other studies so keep these thoughts in mind if you’re someone who is influenced to start or stop eating a certain food because of something you read regarding a study. Its’ always a good idea to look for more information from other sources before making a decision based on a study.

Read the article at Food Politics.com

 

March is National Nutrition Month

Arranged Vegetables Creating a Face

National Nutrition Month comes at the perfect time of year! With warmer weather on the way, we’ll soon be taking our Spring and Summer clothes out of storage.

We hope everything still fits after a long Fall and Winter filled with many holidays and high-calorie foods! For those of us in the colder parts of the world, we also get less activity when it’s too cold to be outside.

To help you get started on your Spring eating and activity plans before you put on your first pair of shorts, check out these tips from the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Choose My Plate site.

You’ll find tip sheets and interactive tools to help you make healthier choices yourself and your family.

If you’re a health educator, school teacher, or home-schooler, there’s also the My Plate for Schools section where you can find learning materials to use in your health lessons.

My favorite tip is “Make Small Changes”. Rather than trying a total diet overhaul, just decide to change one thing. Try eating fruit for dessert instead of ice cream. Do that for a few weeks until it becomes a new habit, then make a new change, like going out for a short walk after dinner.

Every little change you make moves you closer to your fitness and wellness goals.

So, click here and started on your diet and nutrition plan today!

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/national-nutrition-month

Share the small changes you plan to make this month or your favorite health and wellness website!

 

 

 

Hippocrates: The Original Naturopath

hippocrates-food-medicineFirst in Physiology, First in Holistic Health, First in Accountability

Hippocrates of Cos, (5th Century B.C.E.), the Greek “Father of Medicine”, is also the father of Holistic Healing, although many may not realize this.  Hippocrates was the first physician to closely study the human body’s functions to diagnose and treat disease.  He was also the first to turn away from what in his day was considered ‘mainstream medicine’—prayers and sacrifices to the Gods and Goddess for relief and cure of the ailment.

During the birth of conventional medicine in late 19th to early 20th centuries, that concept was considered to be an extreme departure from ‘modern’ medicine.  With that in mind, it is interesting to note that today’s ‘alternative medicine’ is, in a way, a return to the mainstream of Hippocrates’ day:  appeals to spirituality and faith as a part of the healing process.

In this ‘new age’ of the 21st century, recognition of the power of the mind and spirit to heal the body is becoming more acceptable.  In the news, we hear about people conquering cancer, diabetes, heart disease and immune disorders through ‘positive thinking’, a change in diet and a return to nature.

Hippocrates’ most famous lesson was, “Let food be thy medicine and  thy medicine be food”.  Another of his lessons is:  “Neither repletion, nor fasting, nor anything else, is good when more than natural.”  What is ‘natural’ differs among everyone—some have lower tolerance to viruses, some have higher metabolism, while others may fluctuate between the highs and lows.

The trick is in balancing the repletion, the fasting, and the ‘anything else’ between too little and too much.  Hippocrates was the first proponent of balance and moderation in maintaining health, and probably the first ‘diet doctor’ when he wrote: “Persons who are naturally very fat are apt to die earlier than those who are slender.”

He was also the first to observe the mind/body connection:  “Persons who have a painful affection in any part of the body, and are in a great measure sensible of the pain, are disordered in intellect”, and “In every disease it is a good sign when the patient’s intellect is sound, and he is disposed to take whatever food is offered to him; but the contrary is bad.”

One concept put forward by Hippocrates especially deserves our attention today:  the concept of ‘environmental influences’ on health—that is, weather, the seasons, and the climate in which a person lives.  Hippocrates believed:  “Of natures, some are well—or ill-adapted for summer, and some for winter.” and “In autumn, diseases are most acute, and most mortal, on the whole. The spring is most healthy, and least mortal”, and also “If the summer be dry and northerly and the autumn rainy and southerly, headaches occur in winter, with coughs, hoarsenesses, coryzae, and in some cases consumptions.”

Barometric pressure plays a large role in the way we feel throughout the year, as does too much damp or too much dry, too little sun or too much rain.  Of course today, we have other environmental issues unknown in 5th century Greece:  pollution, global warming, radiation, toxic metals, electro-magnetic frequencies, microwave radiation, pesticides and a host of other problems.)  What Would Hippocrates Do?

That’s just the outdoors.  We really spend a great deal of time indoors, so sometimes our worst environmental enemy can be a ‘sick building’.  In our homes, schools and workplaces, we have rampant bacteria and viruses being spun through forced air systems while the windows remain securely sealed. The majority of our exposure to light comes from fluorescent tubes, not sunlight.

Therefore, it is readily apparent that a healthy environment is a very important factor in our health, in addition to a healthy body, mind and spirit.  Hippocrates’ writings devote a great deal of space to environmental factors which also include a person’s locale: “We must consider, also, in which cases food is to be given once or twice a day, and in greater or smaller quantities, and at intervals. Something must be conceded to habit, to season, to country, and to age.”

Hippocrates wrote his Aphorisms as a legacy to be passed down to all those wishing to become knowledgeable in the healing arts.  Granted some of his techniques, such as bloodletting, are no longer considered standard procedures today (fortunately!); however, most of what Hippocrates has handed down is still applicable.  He addresses the spiritual part of the mind/body/spirit triad in his Oath, which opens with, “I swear by Apollo the physician, and Asclepius, and Hygeia and Panacea and all the gods and goddesses as my witnesses…”  He later promises, “In purity and according to divine law will I carry out my life and my art.”

Though the Aphorisms make little mention of the influences of spirituality upon health, his Oath obviously shows thought given to the influences of integrity, honesty and purity on the part of the physician.  Although it isn’t documented, it may be that Hippocrates knew about ‘transference’—the ability of the healer to transmit either positive or negative influences to the patient, thus affecting his/her treatment for better or worse.  In this view, it is much better for the physician to put forth a positive attitude.

The primary tenet of the Hippocratic Oath is “to do no harm”.   It is commonly believed that taking the Oath is a requirement for graduation from medical school, however, that is not the case.  A student can choose to include the Oath in the ceremony only if he/she wishes but it is not mandated.  It’s a sad statement, and a reflection on our times that healers can choose to disregard the Oath.

Dr. Jack Kervorkian comes to mind as one who bears the title ‘Dr.’ yet flaunts the part of the Oath that states “I will not give a lethal drug to anyone if I am asked, nor will I advise such a plan…”  Another hot topic in health care, patient privacy was addressed by Hippocrates as well: “Whatever I see or hear in the lives of my patients, whether in connection with my professional practice or not, which ought not to be spoken of outside, I will keep secret, as considering all such things to be private.” Who would have thought that the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was originally conceived of in the 5th century?  I guess today we could call this the “HIPAAcratic Oath.”  LOL.   😉

It is safe to say that the overwhelming popularity of alternative medicine and natural healing can be traced to the desire to return to simpler times–before the days of outrageously-priced invasive surgeries, prescription medications and HMO’s.   It may also be safe to say that the next big ‘shake-up’ for the health care industry will be the masses of people either flocking to naturopathic practitioners or simply staying home and treating themselves.

Prevention is an ugly word in the world of corporately-owned health care–it implies a decrease in visits and therefore revenue.  Natural and herbal remedies are anathema to the pharmaceutical industry.  It doesn’t have to be that way. Rather than fighting it, the health care industry could embrace the wave and allow itself to return to simpler times and milder treatment.  How could it get any simpler than ancient Greece?

 

References

Hippocrates of Cos (1849) Works:  Aphorisms.  (F. Adams, Trans.).   London:  University of Adelaide Library E-books Program.  (Original work published 5th century B. C. E.).  Retrieved February 19, 2006. http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/h/hippocrates/h7w/aphorism.html

National Institute of Health.  (2000)  Greek Medicine.  (M. North, Trans.)  National Library of Medicine:  History of Medicine Division.  Retrieved February 19, 2006.  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/greek/greek_oath.html

Spiritual Living

bulbrd-rnbw-spiritual-livingIn the U. S., about 8 in 10 people identify with a religion and/or believe in a higher power or universal spirit. Some people considers themselves “spiritual” but not “religious”, while there are some who claim to be religious but are lacking in spiritual qualities. Some believe  there is no difference between the two, and many wonder what the difference is, if there is one. If you look at the dictionary definitions, they do appear to be much the same:

Religion:

  1. The belief in and reverence for a supernatural power or powers, regarded as creating and governing the universe: respect for religion.
  2. A particular variety of such belief, especially when organized into a system of doctrine and practice: the world’s many religions.
  3. A set of beliefs, values, and practices based on the teachings of a spiritual leader.

Spiritual:

  1. Of, relating to, consisting of, or having the nature of spirit; not material; supernatural: spiritual power.
  2. Of, concerned with, or affecting the soul: spiritual guidance; spiritual growth.
  3. Not concerned with material or worldly things: lead a spiritual life.
  4. Of or belonging to a religion; sacred: spiritual practices; spiritual music.

(Dictionary.com)

The subtle difference between the two lies in definition #3 under Religion: A set of beliefs, values, and practices based on the teachings of a spiritual leader. People can be spiritual without subscribing to a specific religion. It’s a little harder to have religion without spirituality but not impossible. We can see this in those mega-bucks church organizations who profit from the showmanship of “religion” as a front for fund-raising to the tune of several million.

In these Journal pages, the term spirituality may be used interchangeably with spiritual rather than by its dictionary meaning, which defines spirituality as being related to clergy or the holdings of a church.

Spiritual Living begins with your connection to your “inner being” or  “higher self”–the spirit within that guides your principles and values. It’s about becoming or being attuned to a higher power or presence, an energy source of love and peace, as represented by a spiritual entity, leader, or guide of your understanding. Spiritual Living also embraces your connections to a spouse or life partner, children, grandchildren, parents, family, friends, acquaintances, co-workers, organizations, and communities.

Our focus is in this section will be on Spirituality rather than Religion. Religion has become a very sensitive topic on social media these days so our goal here is to create a place of inclusiveness for people of all backgrounds and beliefs, and to avoid judgment, criticism, and “I’m right, you’re wrong” arguments.  (Refer to the Policies page for further guidance on behavior in discussions.)

“Finding Meaning” is one of the twelve dimensions of wellness as defined by the Wellness Inventory and in my opinion is among the most important to Spiritual Living. Finding meaning applies to everything from discovering your life’s purpose to exploring why we become attracted to certain ideas, things, or people. This dimension is one that is very important to behavior and wellness, and one that we’ll talk about in-depth.

So, now we’d like to ask: What does “spiritual living” mean to you?  Leave your reply in the ‘envelope’ below.

Junk Food and Healthy Nutrition

Junk food has its place in diet and nutrition.

OK–stop cheering–I’m not finished.

HNjunkfoodjunkie-female

Junk food has its place because it motivates discussion of healthy nutrition as a hot topic these days.

Some of us haven’t talked about nutrition since grade school health lessons. How many of us today really remember why our bodies need magnesium? I know I didn’t until I ventured into diet and nutrition studies.

I’ve since learned that magnesium is a really, really important mineral for a lot of reasons. But this article is about junk food, not magnesium. We will talk more about magnesium in future articles though.

However, because I don’t want to leave you sitting here now wondering about magnesium, I’ll give you this link to my favorite go-to site for health

information: WebMD explains the need for magnesium much better than I can.


There are a few reasons why I chose to open this discussion of Healthy Nutrition with “Junk Food”:

  1. It is a major culprit in chronic pain and fatigue syndromes as well as problems like cardiovascular disease (heart and circulatory dysfunction), diabetes (blood sugar imbalance), and gastrointestinal distress (upset tummy, acid reflux, ulcers, and other nasty stomach problems).
  2. Believe it or not, changing your diet from junk food to whole food is easier than you think.
  3. Learning about the junk food industry is a hugemotivator toward making healthy diet changes

These were the first three things I learned in my quest for a healthier lifestyle so that’s why Lesson 1 is about Junk Food.


DIY Nutrition Project 1: Learn about the junk food industry

Watch How to Get Fat Without Really Trying, an ABC News documentary with the late Peter Jennings.

This is the video that really got me thinking about what I was mindlessly buying and eating. It got me so riled up that the first thing I did was stop eating boxed macaroni and cheese (which I loved!). It started as my own personal boycott in protest against the food industry and turned into a victory for me when I began feeling better within a couple of months. This one small action–giving up mac n’ cheese–was the start of my movement toward real food.

That’s all it takes: one small action. Giving up just one thing that’s not good for you.

Watch the video in the Healthy Nutrition video library at YouTube. You can choose between watching:

A condensed 10 minute version by Nutrition Mom

This video is a shorter version hitting upon some of the highlights from the full documentary.

The complete 5-part documentary by FoodMattersMovie.com

This is the in-depth version that covers all the tactics and trickery the food industry uses to get us hooked on junk food

Note the happy faces of the corporate food manufacturers and government officials as they talk about ways they get us addicted to processed foods while they become billionaires doing it. And then tell us that our addictions are entirely OUR fault because we’ve demanded junk food all on our own, with no help at all from advertising.

If no part of this video makes you feel disgusted, then you just might be a hopeless junk food junkie.

After you watch it, scroll down to ‘leave a reply’ to share your comments. And share this post with friends, too.

Let’s all work together to let them know we’re not going to take this anymore!